IN THE CHEST OF POLITICS – REV. ABEIKU OKAI

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The phone rang, cutting through the silence like a verdict. On the other end, Mona answered, her voice steady, a stark contrast to the turmoil Mr. Adjoka felt within. The conversation that followed would be a battle of wits and wills, a final confrontation between the disgraced official and the courageous whistleblower.

 

“Hello?” Mona said.

 

“Mona, you deceitful little—!” Mr. Adjoka shouted. “You think you can just walk away after what you’ve done? Do you have any idea what kind of hell you’ve unleashed on me and my office?”

 

“Oh, I’m fully aware, Mr. Adjoka,” Mona replied calmly. “The question is, are you?”

 

“Don’t play coy with me!” Mr. Adjoka retorted. “You’ve ruined my career, my reputation! I’ve lost everything because of you. But you haven’t seen the end of this. I will make sure you pay for this, dearly.”

 

“Is that so?” Mona said, her voice steady. “Because I have a feeling you’re not in a position to make threats right now.”

 

“Don’t test me, Mona. You have no idea who you’re dealing with,” Mr. Adjoka warned.

 

“Actually, I think I do,” Mona countered. “You see, I’ve got a few videos. Videos of you and a number of women, right there in your office. How do you think those would look in the public eye? Or should I say, to your wife?”

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“You… you wouldn’t dare,” Mr. Adjoka stammered.

 

“Try me,” Mona said firmly. “I have no interest in your money, Adjoka. I’m not after a payout. I just want you to disappear from public service. Forever.”

 

“Please, Mona, listen,” Mr. Adjoka pleaded. “We can work something out. I can pay you, whatever you want. Just name your price.”

 

“You still don’t get it, do you?” Mona said. “It’s not about money. It’s about integrity, something you wouldn’t understand. Stay out of public service, Adjoka. Mind your own business and consider this your one and only warning.”

 

“Mona, please,” Mr. Adjoka begged. “I’ll lose everything. My family… my children. Please, don’t ruin me completely.”

 

“That’s on you,” Mona responded. “Just remember, if I ever see or hear of you trying to worm your way back into any position of power, those videos go public. Understood?”

 

“Yes,” Mr. Adjoka said, defeated. “I understand.”

 

“Good,” Mona concluded. “Have a nice life, Adjoka. Away from the public eye.”

 

As the call ended, Mona stood by the window, the phone still warm in her hand. The night was silent, save for the distant hum of the city. She gazed out at the twinkling lights, each one a story, a life touched by the events of the day. She had crossed a line from which there was no return, but it was a line that had to be crossed for the greater good.

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Abeiku Okai

(+233) 0249287855

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